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Road safety and cycling: Overview

Tue, 14 Nov 2017, 4:01pm
'More' as well as 'safer' cycling can and should go hand-in-hand Tuesday, 14 November 2017Road safety and cycling: OverviewHeadline Message 
  • Cycling is essentially a safe activity, causing little risk either to cyclists themselves or to other road users. Moreover, there is good evidence that cyclists gain from ‘safety in numbers’, with cycling becoming safer as cycle use increases.
  • However, fear of road traffic is a major deterrent, despite the health, environmental and other benefits of cycling.
  • Actual cycle safety in the UK lags behind many of our continental neighbours, because of poorly designed roads and junctions, traffic volumes and speeds, irresponsible driving, and a legal system that fails to respond adequately to road danger.
  • National and local government should therefore aim for more as well as safer cycling. These two aims can and should go hand-in-hand.
Policy Key Facts 
  • The life years gained due to the health and fitness benefits of cycling in Britain outweigh the life-years lost through injuries by a factor of around 20:1.
  • From 2012-2016, one cyclist was killed on Britain’s roads for every 30 million miles travelled by cycle - the equivalent to well over 1,000 times around the world.
  • Figures for the last three years suggest that, per billion miles travelled, pedestrians were more likely than cyclists to be killed.
  • However, around 59% of non-cyclists in Britain feel that it is too dangerous for them to cycle on the roads.
  • Overall, the UK has a good road safety record - but for cycle safety in particular, it is one of the poorer performing countries in Europe.
  • From 2006, for every one billion miles cycled, the number of cyclists killed or seriously injured (KSI) increased at least until 2012 (in 2006, there were 868 cyclist KSI per billion miles, and 1,070 in 2012). Most of the following years witnessed a drop, but the 2016 figure (1,011 KSI per billion miles) is still higher than that for 2006. In contrast, the KSI rates for people in motor vehicles were all higher in 2006 than they were ten years on.
Cycling UK View 
  • Road safety strategies, nationally and locally, should recognise that:
    • Cycling is a safe activity, posing little risk either to cyclists themselves or to other road users
    • The health benefits of cycling far outweigh the risks involved 
    • Combined with good provision, cycling gets safer the more cyclists there are: the ‘safety in numbers’ effect 
    • The aim of cycle safety policies and initiatives should be to encourage more as well as safer cycling, in order to maximise its health, environmental and other benefits, and to improve overall safety for all road users
  • Encouraging more as well as safer cycling involves tackling factors that deter cycle use. These include high traffic volumes and speeds; irresponsible driver behaviour; the unfriendly design of many roads and junctions; and lorries. 
  • The provision of cycle training to the national standard can also help people to cycle more, to ride more safely, and to feel safer and more confident while doing so. It can also help parents feel more confident about allowing their children to cycle. 
  • Increases in cyclist casualties may still mean cycle safety is improving if cycle use is increasing more steeply than cyclist casualties. Therefore targets and indicators for the effectiveness of road safety strategies should adopt ‘rate-based’ measures for improvements in cycle safety, e.g. cycle casualties (or fatal and serious injuries) per million km cycled, or per million trips. Simple casualty reduction targets should be avoided. 
  • ‘Perception-based’ indicators, which show whether public perceptions of cycle safety in a given area are getting better, can be used alongside ‘rate-based’ indicators, or as an interim substitute for the latter if necessary. 
  • Care should be taken to avoid cycle safety awareness campaigns that ‘dangerise’ cycling. These deter people from cycling or allowing their children to cycle and are counter-productive because they erode the ‘safety in numbers’ effect, as well as undermining the activity’s wider health and other benefits.
Download the full detailed campaign briefing  Cycling and road safety: Overviewroad safetySafe Drivers and Vehicles 'More' as well as 'safer' cycling can and should go hand-in-hand.

Cyclists' behaviour and the law

Tue, 14 Nov 2017, 2:19pm
Cycling UK advocates responsible cycling, but believes that cyclists should never have to choose between keeping safe and obeying the law Tuesday, 14 November 2017Cyclists' behaviour and the lawHeadline Message 
  • Cyclists should behave responsibly and within the law. They pose little risk to others, however.
  • Cyclists are often faced with the difficult choice of either acting legally or keeping safe. Children, for example, may feel safer cycling on the pavement alongside a busy, hostile road, but are breakign the law if it hasn’t been converted to shared use. It is important that the law and those applying it take this into account. The planners and designers of the road network need to be mindful of this too.
  • Whilst Cycling UK encourages cyclists to undertake cycle training and to have insurance cover, making training or licences compulsory for cyclists is unworkable and would deter people from cycling occasionally or giving it a try. It would not solve any problems and the running costs would be prohibitive.
Policy Key Facts 
  • In 2016 (GB), 11,783 cycles were involved in incidents in which a police officer assigned one or more ‘contributory factors’ (CFs) to at least one of the parties at the scene. They assigned 138 CFs for disobeying an automatic traffic signal to the cycle, i.e. to just over 1% of them - about the same percentage as it was for cars; and 236 CFs for “not displaying lights at night or in poor visibility” to the cycle, i.e. to 2% of them.
  • From 2005-14 (GB): 98.5% of pedestrian fatalities and 95.7% of pedestrian serious injuries that happened in collisions on a footway/verge involved a motor vehicle of some kind; no pedestrians were killed by red light jumping cyclists, while around five a year were killed by red light jumping drivers.
  • With around 25 million children and adults aged five+ owning a bicycle in Great Britain, a licensing and compulsory training system for cyclists/cycles would be complex and very costly – not much less so than the current system for drivers (almost 38.5 million) and private cars (over 29 million).
  • In the Netherlands and Denmark, where 27% and 17% of trips are cycled respectively, there is no requirement for cyclists to be tested, licenced/registered etc.
  • A variety of regulatory systems have been introduced in other countries or in cities elsewhere (e.g. Toronto and Switzerland), but subsequently abolished (e.g. in Toronto and Switzerland); either that, or their main aim isn’t/wasn’t to tackle irresponsible behaviour, but bike theft (e.g. in Japan).
Cycling UK View 
  • Cyclists, like all road users, should behave responsibly and within the law.
  • The enforcement of road traffic rules, and penalties for breaching them, should be proportionate to the potential danger imposed on other people, especially vulnerable road users. This principle also applies to off-road rights of way.
  • Road traffic rules should not put cyclists in situations where they feel they must choose between acting legally and protecting their own safety. Those responsible for making and enforcing the rules must take into account the reasons behind cyclists’ offending behaviour.
  • Cycling UK does not condone unlawful cycling on pavements (footway). However, the police should exercise discretion in the use of fixed penalty notices (FPNs) for pavement cycling and discriminate between those whose behaviour is dangerous and antisocial and those who are acting out of concern for their own safety without presenting any threat to others.
  • The police and others charged with applying the law should be able to send offending cyclists on training programmes as an alternative to prosecution or fixed penalty notices (FPNs).
  • Highway authorities should tackle any hazardous road conditions or poor design that may explain illegal behaviour by cyclists in certain locations.
  • A system of compulsory licensing and cycle training is unworkable and unjustifiable, not least because children have the same legal rights to cycle as adults and expecting them to hold licences is impractical. While the running costs would be high (i.e. similar to schemes that apply to motor vehicles and drivers), the benefits would be negligible, and the bureaucracy involved likely to seriously deter newcomers and occasional cyclists.
  • Cycling UK does not actively support Critical Mass, but recognises the motivation of those involved.
Download the full detailed campaign briefing  Cyclists' behaviour and the lawtraffic lawroad safetyoffencesenforcementSafe Drivers and Vehicles Cyclists should behave responsibly and legally, but the law should recognise that they do little harm and should not have to choose between keeping safe and obeying rules.

Conviction upheld of taxi driver in death of Sam Boulton

Thu, 12 Oct 2017, 2:29pm
Sam Boulton was tragically knocked off his bike and killed on 27 July 2016. Photo: Leicestershire Police By SamJonesThursday, 12 October 2017Conviction upheld of taxi driver in death of Sam BoultonCycling UK says case acts as reminder for all drivers and passengers to take care when opening their car doors. Leicester Crown Court Court:  

Farook Yusuf Bhikhu, the taxi driver convicted of permitting the ‘car dooring’ which led to the death of Leicester teacher Sam Boulton, today (12 October) saw his appeal rejected by the court.

Bhikhu was convicted of the offence of ‘car-dooring’ in Loughborough Magistrates Court on 5 June. He was originally handed a £955 fine, broken down as £300 for the offence, a £30 victim surcharge and £625 court costs, to be paid in £20 weekly instalments.  Following the rejection of his appeal, further costs of £300 were ordered by the magistrate.

A local school teacher, Sam was cycling along London Road in Leicester on 27 July 2016 at around 1.20pm. Bhikhu, having parked outside Leicester train station on a double yellow line, permitted his passenger, Ms Chapple to open her door on the roadside.

This caused a collision with Sam, knocking him off his bicycle and into the path of an oncoming Citroen van. Sam sustained fatal injuries and tragically died later that day, his 26th birthday.

Chapple pleaded guilty at the time of the initial hearing at Leicester Magistrates Court in March earlier this year, and was handed a £150 fine. Bhikhu submitted a plea of not guilty at the same time and his case went to trial, resulting in his conviction, which was upheld today.

‘Car-dooring’ is a criminal offence for which both the person in charge of the vehicle at the time, and the person opening the door are potentially culpable. The offence is punishable with a maximum fine of up to £1,000.

Cycling UK and Sam’s family, wants to see more public awareness on the dangers of car-dooring which could be significantly reduced through simple techniques such as the Dutch Reach.

Jeff Boulton, father of Sam, said:

“I’m relieved to hear the court uphold the decision from June earlier this year. In July 2016 our family received a lifelong sentence, because Bhikhu parked irresponsibly to save a couple of minutes and took no responsibility for his passenger’s actions.

“Despite Bhikhu’s major role in the events leading to the death of my son, his refusal to see how his action resulted in the death of a wonderful and talented young man, is almost as upsetting as the way the law trivialises car-dooring.”

Cycling UK believes the current offence of ‘car-dooring’ which can have serious and life changing consequences, is trivialised as a minor offence. In light of the tragic death of Sam Boulton, the charity has continued to press the Government to introduce a new offence of causing serious injury or death by car dooring, with tougher penalties.

Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK’s Head of Advocacy and Campaigns said:

“This tragic case should act as a reminder for all drivers about their responsibility to ensure passengers do not cause injury or death when exiting a vehicle.

“Sam’s needless death also highlights the need for urgent action from the Government to change the law on car-dooring offences. A maximum £1000 fine is inadequate for entirely avoidable behaviour which can kill. This is why Cycling UK and the families of those affected by car dooring have asked Government to introduce a new offence of causing or permitting serious injury or death by car dooring, with tougher penalties.

“Driver education must be improved. In early September, Cycling UK wrote to Transport Minister, Jesse Norman, about the potential to educate UK drivers and their passengers about the “Dutch Reach”, a technique which can help reduce the risk of car-dooring. We are still waiting for his response.”

Notes to editors:
  1. Cycling UK, the national cycling charity, inspires and helps people to cycle and keep cycling, whatever kind of cycling they do or would like to do. Over a century’s experience tells us that cycling is more than useful transport; it makes you feel good, gives you a sense of freedom and creates a better environment for everyone. www.cyclinguk.org
  2. Farook Yusuf Bhikhu convicted of the offence of ‘car-dooring’ on 05 June 2017 and was handed a £955 fine, broken down as £300 for the offence, a £30 victim surcharge and £625 court costs. This was to be paid in £20 weekly instalments.  https://www.cyclinguk.org/press-release/2017-06-05/taxi-driver-convicted-%E2%80%98car-dooring%E2%80%99-incident-caused-cyclist-death
  3. The passenger, Ms Chapple, pleaded guilty to the crime of car dooring on 03 March 2017, and was handed a £150 fine, broken down as £80 for the offence, a £40 victim surcharge and £30 court costs.
  4. 'Car dooring' is a criminal offence under Regulation 105 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1986/1078/regulation/105/made  and Section 42 Road Traffic Act 1988 http://www.cyclistsdefencefund.org.uk/the-law-for-cyclists-hit-by-vehicle-doors. However this offence is only punishable by a fine of up to £1,000 and no penalty points can be imposed on the offender’s licence.  
  5. There were 3,108 reported collisions where ‘vehicle door opened or closed negligently’ was a contributing factor in incidents attended by the police between 2011 and 2015. The breakdown below were released following a FOI from Cycling UK to the Department for Transport requesting a breakdown of the “Contributory factors for reported road accidents (RAS50)” see RAS50007 specifically https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/ras50-contributory-factors
  6. Cycling UK has made the case for adequate sentencing for car dooring offences in their response to the Ministry of Justice’s consultation on the review of road traffic offences and penalties, and in their recent letter to Transport Minister Jesse Norman, https://www.cyclinguk.org/press-release/2017-09-10/cycling-uk-calls-greater-public-awareness-%E2%80%9Ccar-dooring%E2%80%9D
  7. For further information on the Dutch Reach and Cycling UK’s position see: https://www.cyclinguk.org/blog/samjones/dutch-reach
  8. Cyclist Sam Harding was killed https://www.cyclinguk.org/cycle/car-door-dangers in August 2012, when driver Kenan Aydogdu opened his car door in front of Harding on London's Holloway Road. Given that this was not a 'driving offence', and the maximum penalty for car dooring was only £1000, the Crown Prosecution Service brought a 'manslaughter' prosecution against him, but he was acquitted despite his windows being coated with dark plastic film, reducing visibility in and out of the car to 17% of their normal level. He was fined £200 for the car-dooring offence.
  9. Cyclist Robert Hamilton was killed in January 2014, when driver Joanne Jackson opened the driver’s door of her car in front of Robert as he was cycling along Linaker Street in Southport. Jackson was prosecuted for a car-dooring offence and fined £305.
Contact information For more information contact the national Cycling UK Press Office on 01483 238 315, 07786 320 713 or email publicity@cyclinguk.org United Kingdom Sponsored Advert googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display("dfp-ad-sidebar_button_1"); }); Sponsored Advert googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display("dfp-ad-sidebar_button_2"); }); Sponsored Advert googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display("dfp-ad-sidebar_button_3"); }); Sponsored Advert googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display("dfp-ad-sidebar_button_4"); }); Sponsored Advert googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display("dfp-ad-sidebar_button_5"); });

Government launches “urgent review” into cycling offences

Thu, 21 Sep 2017, 4:11pm
Government has decided an "urgent review" for cycling offences is needed, while its road traffic offences review is still delayed by three years By SamJonesThursday, 21 September 2017Government launches “urgent review” into cycling offencesThe Department for Transport today (Thursday, 21 September) announced that it will be conducting an “urgent review” into new offences relating causing death by careless or dangerous cycling.

The announcement follows the well-publicised prosecution and sentencing of Charlie Alliston for 18 months under the charge of “furious and wanton driving”. Alliston was cycling a fixed wheel bike, which lacked a front brake making it illegal, when he collided with mother of two, Kim Briggs, who was crossing Old Street in London. Kim Briggs later passed away as a result of the head injuries she incurred. 

The prosecution and sentencing has stirred wide ranging debate around the calls from widower, Matt Briggs, for new legislation to be introduced that would create new offences of causing death by careless and death by dangerous cycling, mirroring the existing laws in place for dangerous and careless driving.  

This culminated in the Prime Minister, Theresa May, indicating during Prime Minister’s Questions on 06 September that the Department for Transport was looking at this issue of legislation. 

While understanding the motives behind such calls, Cycling UK has urged caution from legislators and commentators alike, pointing out new legislation relating solely to one mode of transport was “misguided” when the whole system relating to road traffic offences and sentencing was failing to work, particularly in the offences for careless and dangerous driving. 

Cycling UK and other road safety organisations, such as RoadPeace, have long campaigned on the need to reform the way the justice system deals with mistakes, carelessness, recklessness and deliberately dangerous behaviour by all road users.

This was recognised by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) in May 2014, when Chris Grayling MP, the then Justice Secretary, announced the Government’s “intention to launch a full review of all driving offences and penalties, to ensure people who endanger lives and public safety are properly punished.” 

The proposed review of cycling offences needs to be carried out as part of the Government’s promised wider review of all road traffic offences and sentencing.

Paul Tuohy, Cycling UK CEO

From May 2014 to December 2016, there have been at least 22 interventions from MPs and Lords in both Houses of Parliaments requesting an update on the full review from Government, with no indication when the review would be launched apart from “soon”.

In December 2016, a limited review was finally announced by the MoJ and received over 9,000 responses by the time it closed at the beginning of February 2017. The results of this review have still not been published. 

Commenting on the Government’s “urgent review” of cycling offences, Paul Tuohy, Cycling UK’s Chief Executive pointed out the benefits of a holistic review, and the need to look at all road traffic offences, saying, “The proposed review of cycling offences needs to be carried out as part of the Government’s promised wider review of all road traffic offences and sentencing. This will ensure the justice system can deal with mistakes, carelessness, recklessness and deliberately dangerous behaviour by all road users.”

Going largely uncommented on, but not entirely, in today’s coverage of the announcement, but of interest to the cycling community is a second but wider consultation “on road safety issues relating to cycling”. Further details are promised from the Department for Transport, but they will be looking for engagement from organisations like Cycling UK on how to improve safety between different road users. 

Suggesting a bright side to the day's announcement Paul continues: “The consultation on road safety issues is an opportunity to keep cyclists and pedestrians safer,” but he stresses the need for this consultation to use the available evidence to inform its views on tackling the known perils, and the important role Cycling UK will have to keep the DfT on track: “Cycling UK looks forward to working with the Department for Transport on this consultation to ensure it focuses on evidenced ways that keep our most vulnerable road users safe, by addressing risks such as dangerous roads, drivers and vehicles."

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Government launches “urgent review” into cycling offences

Thu, 21 Sep 2017, 4:11pm
The Department for Transport today (Thursday, 21 September) announced that it will be conducting an “urgent review” into new offences relating causing death by careless or dangerous cycling.

The announcement follows the well-publicised prosecution and sentencing of Charlie Alliston for 18 months under the charge of “furious and wanton driving”. Alliston was cycling a fixed wheel bike, which lacked a front brake making it illegal, when he collided with mother of two, Kim Briggs, who was crossing Old Street in London.

read more

Cycling UK reaction to Alliston sentencing

Mon, 18 Sep 2017, 12:18pm
Scales of Justice By SamJonesMonday, 18 September 2017Cycling UK reaction to Alliston sentencing Cycling UK reacts to the sentencing of former courier Charlie Alliston, who collided with mother-of-two, Kim Briggs while riding an illegal fixed wheel bicycle without a front brake. Alliston has been jailed at the Old Bailey for 18 months.

Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK's Head of Advocacy and Campaigns said: 

“The Judge sending Charlie Alliston to prison for 18 months casts some light on the myth peddled in recent weeks: that cyclists can’t be and are never held accountable for irresponsible behaviour which endangers others. As Cycling UK has repeatedly made clear, Alliston’s decision to ride a fixed wheel bicycle without a front brake on busy roads was illegal, stupid, and had tragic consequences for Kim Briggs’ family.

"There may be further calls for new cycling offences, with increased penalties, to be included with current driving offences. Such calls are misguided, as we need a complete review of the way in which the justice system deals with mistakes, carelessness, recklessness and deliberately dangerous behaviour by all road users.

“The Government acknowledged this in 2014 when announcing a full review of all road traffic offences and penalties, but we’re still waiting for a full review, and even the outcome of a limited consultation launched last year.

“Those politicians and commentators who are now suggesting an extension of cycling offences might perhaps consider asking the Government why they have not progressed the wide scale review of offences and penalties they promised three years ago, which victim’s families and road safety organisations have tirelessly demanded.”

Contact information 

Cycling UK Press Office
Email: publicity@cyclinguk.org
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

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Cycling UK reaction to Alliston sentencing

Mon, 18 Sep 2017, 12:18pm
Cycling UK reacts to the sentencing of former courier Charlie Alliston, who collided with mother-of-two, Kim Briggs while riding an illegal fixed wheel bicycle without a front brake. Alliston has been jailed at the Old Bailey for 18 months. scales_of_justice.jpg

Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK's Head of Advocacy and Campaigns said: 

“The Judge sending Charlie Alliston to prison for 18 months casts some light on the myth peddled in recent weeks: that cyclists can’t be and are never held accountable for irresponsible behaviour which endangers others. As Cycling UK has repeatedly made clear, Alliston’s decision to ride a fixed wheel bicycle without a front brake on busy roads was illegal, stupid, and had tragic consequences for Kim Briggs’ family.

Cycling UK Press Office
Email: publicity@cyclinguk.org
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

read more

Cycling UK calls for greater public awareness of 'car dooring'

Mon, 11 Sep 2017, 6:00am
Footage from a hemet camera of a door opening in the path of a cyclist By SamJonesMonday, 11 September 2017Cycling UK calls for greater public awareness of 'car dooring'Cycling UK today (Monday, 11 September) called for wider awareness to be made about the dangers of car dooring and how to prevent it through a public awareness campaign.

Figures released by the Department for Transport to Cycling UK show between 2011 and 2015 there were 3108 people were injured, eight fatally, where ‘vehicle door opened or closed negligently’ was a contributing factor in incidents attended by the police. 2009 of the casualties were people cycling, with five resulting in fatalities.

Cycling UK believes that these figures are not fully representative of the scale of the problem, as not all car dooring incidents will be attended by the police.

In a letter to Transport Minister, Jesse Norman MP, Cycling UK Chief Executive Paul Tuohy has called for a public awareness THINK campaign aimed at all car occupants, not just drivers, to look before opening their door.

Cycling UK believe a method where people open car doors with their far hand, rather than the near could prove beneficial and prevent avoidable collisions. This method, sometimes called 'the Dutch Reach' as it is common practice in the Netherlands, has the benefit of allowing the person opening their car door to look behind while also limiting how far their door can open.

The cycling charity has also suggested a public awareness campaign could include advice on safer road positioning for people cycling, so as to create understanding among all road users about the importance of avoiding the 'door zone'.

The charity would also like to see methods like the 'Dutch Reach' promoted through driver training, and changes to the law which would include an offence of 'death or serious injury through negligently opening a car door'. The current offence of car dooring currently carries a maximum £1,000 penalty, even if someone dies or is seriously injured as a result of the incident.

Paul Tuohy, Cycling UK’s Chief Executive said:

“Some people seem to see car dooring as a bit of a joke, but it’s not and can have serious consequences

“Cycling UK wants to see greater awareness made about the dangers of opening your car door negligently, and people to be encouraged to look before they open.

“In the Netherlands they are known for practicing a method, known sometimes as the “Dutch Reach”, which we think could be successfully encouraged in the UK. Cycling UK has written to the Department for Transport asking them to look into this, and highlight the dangers of “car-dooring” through a public awareness THINK style campaign.”

Contact information 

Cycling UK Press Office
Email: publicity@cyclinguk.org
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

Notes to editors 
  1. Cycling UK, the national cycling charity, inspires and helps people to cycle and keep cycling, whatever kind of cycling they do or would like to do. Over a century’s experience tells us that cycling is more than useful transport; it makes you feel good, gives you a sense of freedom and creates a better environment for everyone. www.cyclinguk.org
  2. 'Car dooring' is a criminal offence under Regulation 105 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1986/1078/regulation/105/made  and Section 42 Road Traffic Act 1988 http://www.cyclistsdefencefund.org.uk/the-law-for-cyclists-hit-by-vehicl.... However this offence is only punishable by a fine of up to £1,000 and no penalty points can be imposed on the offender’s licence.  
  3. Cycling UK recently made the case for adequate sentencing for car dooring offences in their response to the Ministry of Justice’s consultation on the review of road traffic offences and penalties.
  4. For further information on the Dutch Reach, a short video of how to do it and Cycling UK’s position see: https://www.cyclinguk.org/blog/samjones/dutch-reach
  5. There were 3108 reported collisions where ‘vehicle door opened or closed negligently’ was a contributing factor in incidents attended by the police between 2011 and 2015. The breakdown below were released following a FOI from Cycling UK to the Department for Transport requesting a breakdown of the “Contributory factors for reported road accidents (RAS50)” see RAS50007 specifically https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/ras50-contributory-f...  

  6. Cyclist Robert Hamilton was killed in January 2014, when driver Joanne Jackson opened the driver’s door of her car in front of Robert as he was cycling along Linaker Street in Southport. Jackson was prosecuted for a car-dooring offence and fined £305.
  7. Cyclist Sam Harding was killed https://www.cyclinguk.org/cycle/car-door-dangers  in August 2012, when driver Kenan Aydogdu opened his car door in front of Harding on London's Holloway Road. Given that this was not a 'driving offence', and the maximum penalty for car dooring was only £1000, the Crown Prosecution Service brought a 'manslaughter' prosecution against him, but he was acquitted despite his windows being coated with dark plastic film, reducing visibility in and out of the car to 17% of their normal level. He was fined £200 for the car-dooring offence.
  8. Cyclist Sam Boulton was killed on 27 July 2016 outside of Leicester Train station, when passenger of a private hire vehicle, Ms Chapple opened her door, knocking Sam off his bicycle and into the path of an oncoming Citroen van. Sam sustained fatal injuries and tragically died later that day, his 26th birthday. Ms Chapple, pleaded guilty to the crime of car dooring on 03 March 2017, and was handed a £150 fine, broken down as £80 for the offence, a £40 victim surcharge and £30 court costs. https://www.cyclinguk.org/press-release/2017-03-03/car-dooring-offence-m... The driver, Farook Yusuf Bhikhu, had parked illegally on a double yellow line, and was convicted of the offence of ‘car-dooring’ in Loughborough Magistrates Court on 05 June. He was handed a £955 fine, broken down as £300 for the offence, a £30 victim surcharge and £625 court costs, to be paid in £20 weekly instalments. Bhikhu is currently appealing this.
  9. A “car dooring” is available online at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7aUG02uHo0 This was supplied to Cycling UK by Olukayode Ibrahim, from an incident on 04/09/2017, 78 - 80 Tower Bridge Road, London.    

 

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Cycling UK calls for greater public awareness of 'car dooring'

Mon, 11 Sep 2017, 6:00am
Cycling UK today (Monday, 11 September) called for wider awareness to be made about the dangers of car dooring and how to prevent it through a public awareness campaign. screen_shot_2017-09-10_at_16.02.17.png

Figures released by the Department for Transport to Cycling UK show between 2011 and 2015 there were 3108 people were injured, eight fatally, where ‘vehicle door opened or closed negligently’ was a contributing factor in incidents attended by the police. 2009 of the casualties were people cycling, with five resulting in fatalities.

Cycling UK believes that these figures are not fully representative of the scale of the problem, as not all car dooring incidents will be attended by the police.

Cycling UK Press Office
Email: publicity@cyclinguk.org
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

  1. Cycling UK, the national cycling charity, inspires and helps people to cycle and keep cycling, whatever kind of cycling they do or would like to do. Over a century’s experience tells us that cycling is more than useful transport; it makes you feel good, gives you a sense of freedom and creates a better environment for everyone. www.cyclinguk.org
  2. 'Car dooring' is a criminal offence under Regulation 105 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1986/1078/regulation/105/made  and Section 42 Road Traffic Act 1988 http://www.cyclistsdefencefund.org.uk/the-law-for-cyclists-hit-by-vehicl.... However this offence is only punishable by a fine of up to £1,000 and no penalty points can be imposed on the offender’s licence.  
  3. Cycling UK recently made the case for adequate sentencing for car dooring offences in their response to the Ministry of Justice’s consultation on the review of road traffic offences and penalties.
  4. For further information on the Dutch Reach, a short video of how to do it and Cycling UK’s position see: https://www.cyclinguk.org/blog/samjones/dutch-reach
  5. There were 3108 reported collisions where ‘vehicle door opened or closed negligently’ was a contributing factor in incidents attended by the police between 2011 and 2015. The breakdown below were released following a FOI from Cycling UK to the Department for Transport requesting a breakdown of the “Contributory factors for reported road accidents (RAS50)” see RAS50007 specifically https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/ras50-contributory-f...  

  6. Cyclist Robert Hamilton was killed in January 2014, when driver Joanne Jackson opened the driver’s door of her car in front of Robert as he was cycling along Linaker Street in Southport. Jackson was prosecuted for a car-dooring offence and fined £305.
  7. Cyclist Sam Harding was killed https://www.cyclinguk.org/cycle/car-door-dangers  in August 2012, when driver Kenan Aydogdu opened his car door in front of Harding on London's Holloway Road. Given that this was not a 'driving offence', and the maximum penalty for car dooring was only £1000, the Crown Prosecution Service brought a 'manslaughter' prosecution against him, but he was acquitted despite his windows being coated with dark plastic film, reducing visibility in and out of the car to 17% of their normal level. He was fined £200 for the car-dooring offence.
  8. Cyclist Sam Boulton was killed on 27 July 2016 outside of Leicester Train station, when passenger of a private hire vehicle, Ms Chapple opened her door, knocking Sam off his bicycle and into the path of an oncoming Citroen van. Sam sustained fatal injuries and tragically died later that day, his 26th birthday. Ms Chapple, pleaded guilty to the crime of car dooring on 03 March 2017, and was handed a £150 fine, broken down as £80 for the offence, a £40 victim surcharge and £30 court costs. https://www.cyclinguk.org/press-release/2017-03-03/car-dooring-offence-m... The driver, Farook Yusuf Bhikhu, had parked illegally on a double yellow line, and was convicted of the offence of ‘car-dooring’ in Loughborough Magistrates Court on 05 June. He was handed a £955 fine, broken down as £300 for the offence, a £30 victim surcharge and £625 court costs, to be paid in £20 weekly instalments. Bhikhu is currently appealing this.
  9. A “car dooring” is available online at:

    This was supplied to Cycling UK by Olukayode Ibrahim, from an incident on 04/09/2017, 78 - 80 Tower Bridge Road, London.    

 

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Charlie Alliston case

Wed, 23 Aug 2017, 7:03pm
By Victoria HazaelWednesday, 23 August 2017Charlie Alliston caseHere is Cycling UK's response in full to the case of Charlie Alliston, 20, a cyclist who knocked over Kim Briggs resulting in her death in east London last year. Alliston was cleared of her manslaughter, but he was found guilty of causing bodily harm by "wanton or furious driving".

Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK Head of Advocacy and Campaigns said:

"Riding a fixed wheel bicycle on busy roads without a front brake is illegal, stupid, and endangers other road users especially pedestrians. Charlie Alliston's actions had tragic consequences for Kim Briggs' family, and it was entirely right that this led to his prosecution.

"The fact that he has been convicted of an offence dating back to legislation from 1861, drafted in archaic language, will doubtless lead some to argue that the laws on irresponsible cycling should be aligned with the laws on irresponsible driving. The reality is that the way in which the justice system deals with mistakes, carelessness, recklessness and deliberately dangerous behaviour by all road users has long been in need of review. 

"In 2014 the Government acknowledged this when announcing a full review of all motoring offences and penalties, but then waited three years to launch a limited consultation last year which closed six months ago, with silence ever since.

"To ensure that there is consistency with charging decisions, and with how dangerous behaviour on or roads is dealt with, it is vital that the Government ends the delay, and gets on with the wide scale review that politicians from all sides, victims' families and various roads safety organisations have tirelessly demanded.”

Contact information 

Cycling UK Press Office
Email: publicity@cyclinguk.org
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

Notes to editors 

For more information please read our Cyclists' behaviour and the law briefing or What's Legal on a Bike

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Charlie Alliston case

Wed, 23 Aug 2017, 7:03pm
Here is Cycling UK's response in full to the case of Charlie Alliston, 20, a cyclist who knocked over Kim Briggs resulting in her death in east London last year. Alliston was cleared of her manslaughter, but he was found guilty of causing bodily harm by "wanton or furious driving". courts_of_justice_and_bike_edit.jpg

Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK Head of Advocacy and Campaigns said:

"Riding a fixed wheel bicycle on busy roads without a front brake is illegal, stupid, and endangers other road users especially pedestrians. Charlie Alliston's actions had tragic consequences for Kim Briggs' family, and it was entirely right that this led to his prosecution.

Cycling UK Press Office
Email: publicity@cyclinguk.org
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

For more information please read our Cyclists' behaviour and the law briefing or What's Legal on a Bike

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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cycling UK is a trading name of Cyclists’ Touring Club (CTC) a company limited by guarantee, registered in England no: 25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales charity no: 1147607 and in Scotland charity no: sco42541. Registered office: Parklands, Railton Road, Guildford, Surrey GU2 9JX.